Saints & the animals that served them – PDF

https://animalsofmyheart.wordpress.com

ANIMALS OF MY HEART

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https://www.archdiocese.ca/rescs/_files//saints-animals.pdf

Saints & the animals that served them – PDF

╰⊰¸¸.•¨*

Saint Artemon of Laodicea, Syria

Saint Brendan of Ireland

Saint Elijah the Prophet

Saints Florus & Laurus, Martyrs in Illyria, Croatia

Saint Gerasimus of Jordan Desert

Saint Kevin of Ireland

Saint Mamas of Caesarea, Cappadocia, Asia Minor

Saint Menas, Great Martyr of Egypt

Saint Seraphim of Sarov, Russia

Saint Sergius of Radonezh, Russia

Saint Tryphon of Campsada, Apamea, Syria

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Saint Deicola (St Deicolus), the founder and Abbot of a Monastery in Lure, France – Equal of the Apostles and Enlightener of France, from Ireland (+625) – January 18

http://irelandofmyheart.wordpress.com

IRELAND OF MY HEART

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Saint Deicola / Deicolus

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Holy Relics of St Deicola

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St Deicola’s Holy Well

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Saint Deicola (St Deicolus),

the founder and Abbot of a Monastery in Lure, France

 & Equal of the Apostles and Enlightener of France, from Ireland (+625)

Patron Saint of children & animals

January 18

Saint Deicola (Déicole, Dichuil, Deel, Deicolus, Deicuil, Delle, Desle, Dichul, Dicuil) (c. 530 – January 18, 625) is an Orthodox Western saint. He was an elder brother of Saint Gall. Born in Leinster, Deicolus studied at Bangor.

He was selected to be one of the twelve followers to accompany St. Columbanus on his missionary journey. After a short stay in Great Britain in 576 he journeyed to Gaul and laboured with St. Columbanus in Austrasia and Burgundy.

When St. Columbanus was expelled by Theuderic II, in 610, St. Deicolus, then eighty years of age, determined to follow his master, but was forced, after a short time, to give up the journey, and established an hermitage at a nearby church dedicated to St Martin in a place called Lutre, or Lure, in the Diocese of Besançon, to which he had been directed by a swineherd.

Until his death, he became the apostle of this district, where he was given a church and a tract of land by Berthelde, widow of Weifar, the lord of Lure. Soon a noble abbey was erected for his many disciples, and the Rule of St. Columbanus was adopted. Numerous miracles are recorded of St. Deicolus, including the suspension of his cloak on a sunbeam and the taming of wild beasts.

Clothaire II, King of Burgundy, recognised the virtues of the saint and considerably enriched the Abbey of Lure, also granting St. Deicolus the manor, woods, fisheries, etc., of the town which had grown around the monastery. Feeling his end approaching, St. Deicolus gave over the government of his abbey to Columbanus, one of his young monks, and retreated to a little oratory where he died on 18 January, about 625.

His feast is celebrated on 18 January. So revered was his memory that his name (Dichuil), under the slightly disguised form of Deel and Deela, is still borne by most of the children of the Lure district. His Acts were written by a monk of his own monastery in the tenth century.

St. Deicolus is the Patron Saint of children and he cures childhood illnesses. Also, he is Patron Saint of animals.

Source:

Wikipedia &

http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com

Orthodox Heart Sites

Des dizaines de passereaux et d’autres oiseaux entraient et sortaient et au dehors de l’église par les fen êtres ouvertes de la coupole, gazouillant et chantant avec vivacité ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* French

http://divineliturgyexperiences.wordpress.com

EXPERIENCES DURING THE DIVINE LITURGY

Père Stéphane Anagnostopoulos:

Un fidèle m’a raconté un événement similaire qui a eu lieu à l’église de la Mère de Dieu qui s’appelle «Ecatontapyliani» et qui se trouve à Paros (dans les Cyclades, Grèce), pendant la Divine Liturgie de la veille de l’Épiphanie, en 1998.

Des dizaines de passereaux et d’autres oiseaux entraient et sortaient et au dehors de l’église par les fen êtres ouvertes de la coupole, gazouillant et chantant avec vivacité. Pourtant, à l’heure de la consécration des saints dons, ils se sont tus et immobilis és tous pour recommencer après l’ecphonèse: «Et en premier lieu pour notre très sainte…» [Notes personnelles de l’auteur].

Les propres paroles du Seigneur «Ceci est mon corps…ceci est mon sang…» (Marc 14, 22-24) à la sainte Cène, le soir du jeudi saint, témoignent de cette réalité du Changement du pain et du vin en Corps et en Sang du Christ. La constitution donc du saint sacrement est divine. C’est le Christ lui même qui en est l’auteur.

Les signes visibles du saint sacrement sont le pain au levain, le vin et la prière secrète «envoie ton Saint-Esprit sur nous et sur ces Dons…». Ce n’est pas seulement la grâce du Christ qui est transmise par la sainte communion comme c’est le cas d’ ailleurs pour d’autres sacrements, mais c’est le Christ, le Seigneur lui-même. Les fidèles qui reçoivent dignement le Corps et le Sang du Christ, s’ y intègrent, ayant les mêmes corps et sang que Lui. L’adhésion au Corps de l’église, c’est-à-dire l’incorporation, commence par le saint Baptême et s’achève avec la sainte communion, c’est-à-dire l’intégration. Cela veut dire que notre être tout entier reçoit d’une façon mystique la Vie-même, notre Seigneur et Rédempteur et l’incorpore.

Source:

Père Stéphane Anagnostopoulos

Vivre la Divine Liturgie

Expériences Liturgiques

Le Pirée 2011

Saint Pharaildis of Belgium & France raised a goose (+740)

http://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

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France

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Ghent, Belgium

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Bruay-sur-l’Escaut, France

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Saint Pharaildis (Pharailde) of Ghent, Belgium

& Bruay-sur-l’Escaut, France (+740)

January 4

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http://orthodox-heart.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART

Saint Pharaildis or Pharailde (Dutch: Veerle) is an 8th-century Belgian saint and patron saint of Ghent. Her dates are imprecise, but she lived to a great age and died on January 5 at ninety.

Pharaildis was married against her will at a young age with a nobleman, even after having made a private vow of virginity. Her husband insisted that she was married to him, and her sexual fidelity was owed to him, not God. She was therefore physically abused for her refusal to submit to him, and for her late night visits to churches. When widowed, she was still a virgin, and dedicated herself to charity.

According to the Vita Gudilae Pharaildis was the sister of Saint Gudula, Saint Reineldis, and Saint Emebert.

Several miracles are attributed to the saint. Saint Pharaildis caused a well to spring up whose waters cured sick children, turned some bread hidden by a miserly woman into stone, and there are accounts of a “goose miracle,” in which Pharaildis resuscitated a cooked bird working only from its skin and bones.

Saint Pharaildis carries a goose as her insignia.

Her feast day is January 5.

Source:

Wikipedia

&

http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com

ORTHODOX HEART SITES

The fly, the mouse and the cock of Saint Colman of Kilmacduagh, Ireland (+632) – October 29

http://irelandofmyheart.wordpress.com

IRELAND OF MY HEART

The fly, the mouse and the cock

of Saint Colman of Kilmacduagh, Ireland (+632)

October 29

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/75046.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

Like many Irish saints, St. Colman lived in harmony with wild nature. Various versions of his life relate the same and truly striking story (though with different minor details) about the communication of the holy man with animals. This story says that a cock, a mouse, and a fly were Colman’s closest friends in Burren. All of them served their holy master as they could. The cock crowed at a certain time every night, reminding the saint of the time for prayer; the mouse gently touched his face, thus waking him up and ensuring that he slept only five hours per day; the fly carefully crept over the lines of the sacred books that he read, and when his eyes got tired or when the saint had to move away for a while, the fly crawled onto the first letter of the following sentence so that he could never lose his place.

The saint loved and fed these faithful friends. Once Colman got so tired that he fell into a very deep sleep and the mouse could not awaken him as usual. Then it began scratching his ear so hard that Colman awoke immediately: he praised the animal and gave it more food from that time on. One day the saint was away for more than an hour, conversing with a guest. On his return he noticed that the fly was sitting without movement on the very word in his prayer-book where he had stopped before leaving. The saint praised the fly for its zeal and began giving it more breadcrumbs with drops of honey as a treat. But by the end of summer all of them died on the same day: the fly was the first and the mouse and cock died after it from grief. In his sorrow St. Colman wrote a letter to his friend, St. Columba of Iona, telling him this story. And St. Columba sent a letter in reply: “When you had these friends, brother, you were rich. That is why you are in sorrow now. Such sorrows come due to riches. So try not to have riches any more.” And Colman realized that one can be rich even without money.

Saint Colman of Kilmacduagh, Ireland (+632) – October 29

Saint Colman of Kilmacduagh, Ireland (+632)

October 29

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/75046.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

St. Colman (c. 550 or c. 560-632), a great ascetic and one of the most interesting Irish saints of his age, has been venerated and loved by pious Irishmen for more than 1300 years, especially in Counties Galway and Clare (the provinces of Connacht and Munster) on the west coast of present-day Northern Ireland. It is a relief that interest in this wonderworker on the part of modern researchers has now grown.

The future saint was born in Ireland into the family of a chief named Duagh (hence the full name of the saint—Colman Mac Duagh, that is, “Colman, son of Duagh”) and his wife Rhinagh. His birthplace may have been Corker in Galway, which is a pilgrimage site to this day. When he was still in his mother’s womb, she heard a prophecy that her son would become a great man who would surpass in his glory all men in his lineage. According to tradition, the jealous father understood these words not in the spiritual, but in the secular sense and bore malice to the still unborn child. The pregnant mother, fearing for her baby’s safety, fled from their home. However, Duagh’s servants soon found her, tied a heavy stone around her neck and threw her into the river Kiltartin. But by the grace of God Rhinagh was cast ashore, survived and gave birth. The very stone to which she was tied, with marks of the rope, has survived and is kept inside a church in Corker.

When it was time to baptize the newly-born Colman, the priest who came to Rhinagh found that there was no water to perform the baptism. The mother, fearing to go back home, took shelter under an ash-tree. She prayed hard and suddenly a holy spring gushed forth from under the ground near the tree and the baby was baptized in it. Many healings and other miracles occurred from the pure water of this spring, which still exists in Corker near the river and attracts many pilgrims (there are many modern reports of healing from it). Rhinagh entrusted her boy to the care of pious monks.

Already a young man, Colman arrived on the Aran Islands in Donegal where he remained for some years under the great Irish Abbot St. Enda of Inishmore.1 Colman became a monk there and was later ordained priest. According to tradition, St. Colman spent several years as a hermit on Aranmore Island where he also built two churches—the ruins of both of them can still be seen. Aranmore was always known as an island with extremely harsh conditions for life; in spite of this, a multitude of ascetics lived and prayed there for many years throughout “the age of saints” in Ireland.

St. Colman’s zeal and thirst for spiritual perfection were so strong that with time he resolved to leave the island monastery and to retreat to a remote and quiet place to pray more deeply. Thus, according to tradition, from 592 the holy man lived for seven years alone in solitude in the dense Burren forests of County Clare, and obtained the gift of unceasing prayer; he prayed and kept vigil day and night, ate only herbs, drank water and wore a deerskin. In his ascetic practices St. Colman imitated the Egyptian hermits, headed by St. Anthony; many other Celtic saints lived in the same spirit in those centuries. Colman’s hermitage was situated in a perfect setting surrounded by wild forest and the beautiful Burren mountains.

St. Colman made himself a tiny dwelling in a very small cave on a steep slope where he spent most of his time praying. This cave, known as St. Colman’s cave, has been well-preserved to this day. The saint also built a little chapel at the foot of the cliff where he celebrated the services alone. This St. Colman’s Chapel existed for many centuries after him but was severely damaged by puritan iconoclasts in the seventeenth century. However, its ruins survive and still preserve a particular spirit of holiness, which is evidenced by pilgrims who visit this place to this day. The saint drank water from the natural holy well located near the chapel. By the grace of God this holy well survives in good condition, and numerous miracles still occur through its water today.

Like many Irish saints, St. Colman lived in harmony with wild nature. Various versions of his life relate the same and truly striking story (though with different minor details) about the communication of the holy man with animals. This story says that a cock, a mouse, and a fly were Colman’s closest friends in Burren. All of them served their holy master as they could. The cock crowed at a certain time every night, reminding the saint of the time for prayer; the mouse gently touched his face, thus waking him up and ensuring that he slept only five hours per day; the fly carefully crept over the lines of the sacred books that he read, and when his eyes got tired or when the saint had to move away for a while, the fly crawled onto the first letter of the following sentence so that he could never lose his place.

The saint loved and fed these faithful friends. Once Colman got so tired that he fell into a very deep sleep and the mouse could not awaken him as usual. Then it began scratching his ear so hard that Colman awoke immediately: he praised the animal and gave it more food from that time on. One day the saint was away for more than an hour, conversing with a guest. On his return he noticed that the fly was sitting without movement on the very word in his prayer-book where he had stopped before leaving. The saint praised the fly for its zeal and began giving it more breadcrumbs with drops of honey as a treat. But by the end of summer all of them died on the same day: the fly was the first and the mouse and cock died after it from grief. In his sorrow St. Colman wrote a letter to his friend, St. Columba of Iona, telling him this story. And St. Columba sent a letter in reply: “When you had these friends, brother, you were rich. That is why you are in sorrow now. Such sorrows come due to riches. So try not to have riches any more.” And Colman realized that one can be rich even without money.

In the seventh year of Colman’s solitude it came to pass that after spending Lent in fasting and prayer, St. Colman had nothing to eat on the day of Holy Easter. At the same time the pious and generous King Guaire of Connacht (possibly the saint’s cousin) was about to celebrate Easter with his retinue, sitting at table with sumptuous dishes. Suddenly the king exclaimed: “May all of our dinner by Divine providence go to some worthy servant of God! And we will do without such a luxury today.” And at once invisible angels carried all the dishes from the royal table to St. Colman’s cave. The king ordered his men to find out: Who is this holy man to whom angels brought food? And soon the hermit Colman was found. The king marveled at his ascetic life, promised to give him land to found a monastery, and assigned sufficient means to maintain it.

Thus St. Colman left his hermitage and began to serve people. Soon his glory as a wonderworker spread all over the region. Many people came to Colman and obtained healing and consolation. Once the saint’s belt fell on the ground not far from his former hermitage and it was a sign that he was to build a monastery on that spot. The monastery was called Kilmacduagh (“church of the son of Duagh”) and Colman became its first abbot. (His belt was later kept as a relic and many were healed by it). Much against his will, St. Colman was also probably ordained bishop of the region with its center in Kilmacduagh and founded the first cathedral there. Colman, being a bishop and abbot at the same time, labored with all his zeal as a true good pastor, caring for all the monasteries and convents in his diocese and kindling the hearts of his flock with fervent love for Christ our Saviour. But life “in the world” (in comparison with his former seclusion), the fame and praise from people were a burden to him, and with all his heart he desired to return to his beloved way of life one day. And after many years of service to people, the saint resigned his episcopacy seven years before his death. The saint settled in the Oughtmama valley in the Burren area where he reposed on October 29, 632, at a very advanced age.

St. Colman was venerated as a saint immediately after his death and became the patron-saint of Kilmacduagh. In addition to his main relics, the episcopal vestments and the personal staff of St. Colman were kept as precious relics for many centuries, and the staff is still preserved at the National Museum in Dublin—it was used for the taking of oaths in the late medieval period. According to legend, the saint predicted that no man or animal would ever be killed by lightning in the diocese of Kilmacduagh and it is said that this is true to this day.

In medieval times, Kilmacduagh Monastery gained great popularity and excelled in preserving ascetic traditions. This religious site was so important that from the twelfth century on a permanent diocese existed here. Unfortunately, Vikings made raids on the monastery, and it was eventually plundered in the twelfth century. In the thirteenth century an Augustinian Abbey appeared on the site. This monastery was dissolved at the Reformation.

Today Kilmacduagh is a small village in the south of County Galway near the town of Gort. It continues to be a holy site and a destination for pilgrimages. Many ancient picturesque ruins survive, including ruins of the cathedral, monastery churches (St. Mary’s, St. John the Baptist’s and others) and monastic buildings (the abbots’ house). One of its gems is an ancient Irish round tower—the highest surviving such tower in the country (112 feet).

Video – Modern Saints: Makrina, Abbess of Theotokos Monastery (Panagia Odigitria) in Volos, Greece (+1995)

http://havefaithorthodoxy.wordpress.com

HAVE FAITH – ORTHODOXY

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Modern Saints: Makrina,

Abbess of Theotokos Monastery (Panagia Odigitria)

in Volos, Greece (+1995)

Sfânta Sofia din Klisura, Grecia “cea nebună pentru Hristos” și animalele sălbatice (+1974) – 6 mai ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* Romanian

http://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

https://animalsofmyheart.wordpress.com

ANIMALS OF MY HEART

SAINTS OF MY HEART

Sfânta Sofia din Klisura, Grecia

“cea nebună pentru Hristos” și animalele sălbatice (+1974)

6 mai

Dragostea Sfintei Sofia din Klisura nu se răsfrângea numai asupra oamenilor, ci și către întreaga zidire, cuvântătoare sau necuvântătoare, sălbatică sau domestică.

În preajma muntelui sălbatic de lângă mănăstire circulau mulți urși, lupi și alte sălbăticiuni. Cu toate aceste animaluțe reușise să se împrietenească Sfânta Sofia.

Din multele istorioare care circulă cu privire la aceasta, ne vom referi la doar trei, care sunt mai deosebite.

Un soldat pensionar, care obișnuise să o viziteze pe Sfânta Sofia până în clipa morții ei, povestește ceva de neconceput pentru oamenii din zilele noastre.
Sfânta avea o ursoaică, care venea și mânca din mâna ei pâine sau orice altceva. Și puteai vedea acea dihanie imensă, dar fără răutate, luând hrana și lingându-i apoi mâinile și picioarele în semn de mulțumire. Apoi se furișa în pădure. Pe ursoaică o botezase Rusa.

Dimitrie G. născut în anul 1960 în Ptolemaida, povestește că și el o văzuse pe Sfânta Sofia la pârâu împreună cu ursoaica, pe care o ținea legată cu o curelușă. Dacă vreun necunoscut ar fi văzut această priveliște neobișnuită, ar fi înlemnit de spaimă.

Pe Rusa o văzuse și Vasilica K. din Bariko. Odată un soldat, văzând din depărtare fiara împreună cu Cuvioasa, a vrut să o împuște, crezând că îi va face rău. Îndată, însă Sfânta a început sa strige și apropiindu-se de el i-a explicat că animalul sălbatic era blând și fără de răutate.

Alți pelerini au văzut trei serpișori care dormeau la capul Cuvioasei, fără a-i face însă nici un rău și spunându-le oamenilor să nu se teamă pentru ca nu au obiceiul de a mușca.

Unii pelerini care o însoțeau la Biserica Sfintei Treimi, unde îngrijea candela, au văzut un șarpe mare încolăcit și s-au speriat foarte tare vrând să îl omoare. Sfânta i-a certat cu cuvintele: “De vreme ce nu vă deranjează, lăsați-l în pace. Este al bisericii.”

Atât de mare este dragostea Sfinților pentru animale, pentru toată zidirea și în special pentru Ziditorul ei, Care le-a creat pe toate întru adânc de înțelepciune!

Sursă:

https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ΑδελφήΑγάθη

http://cominghomeorthodoxyofmyheart.wordpress.com

COMING HOME – ORTHODOXY

Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991) & his wild birds

http://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

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The parrot of Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991)

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Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991)

December 2

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Saint Porphyrios

of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991)

& his wild birds

Saint Porphyrios was born Evangelos Bairaktaris in the village of Aghios Ioannis in the province of Karystia on the Greek island of Euboea (mod. Evia). The youngest of four, he left school after the first grade and worked in the town of Chalkida at a shop to make money for the family. He was a hard and obedient worker, and stayed there for a few years before moving to Piraeus on the mainland (it is Athens’ port) and working in a general store run by a relative.

Although he hardly knew how to read at the time, Elder Porphyrios had a copy of the Life of St John the Hut-Dweller which he read as a boy. St John inspired him. St John the Hut-Dweller was late fifth-century Constantinopolitan saint who secretly took up the monastic life at the famed monastery of the Acoimetae (Unsleeping Ones). After living for some years according to a very strict rule, St John was granted permission by his abbot to go life near his parents so as to cleanse his heart of earthly love for them. He then dwelled in a hut beside his family, identity unknown, for three years. He revealed himself to Continue reading “Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991) & his wild birds”

Saint Kieran of Saighir in Ireland (+530) & the fox

http://synaxarion-hagiology.blogspot.com

SYNAXARION-HAGIOLOGY

Saint Kieran of Saighir in Ireland (+530) & the fox

March 5

Traditions relating the close communication of Kieran with wild animals abound. When he lived in a hermitage surrounded by forests, wolves, deer and other mammals, particularly those which were sick or hurt, used to come to him, feeling his holiness and asking him to cure them: and he healed every animal. According to his life, a fox, a wolf and a badger helped the saint and served him and his monks in monastic labors: to cut trees, to take the wood to the monastery and build small cells. Once the fox dared to disobey the abbot: it stole his boots and ran away to its hole in the forest. On Kieran’s command the wolf and the badger found the fox and led it to the man of God. He rebuked the fox, ordered it to do a penance by fasting for a certain time, and when the animal had done this, he allowed it to stay at his monastery and work on.

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/91544.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

Saint Kieran of Saighir, Ireland (+530) – March 5

http://saintsofmyheart.wordpress.com

SAINTS OF MY HEART

Saint Kieran of Saighir, Ireland (+530)

March 5

Source:

http://orthochristian.com

http://orthochristian.com/91544.html

ORTHODOX CHRISTIANITY

St. Kieran (Ciaran) of Saighir, or St. Kieran the Elder, is also called “the first-born of the Irish saints”. He was born in the fifth century in the Irish kingdom of Ossory and was related to the royal family. His father Luaigne was from Ossory, and his mother Liadan came from Cork. When Liadan was pregnant, she had a dream that a star fell from the sky and rested on her, which was understood as a sign that her infant would have a special role in the history of the Irish Church. Everybody saw brightness and holiness in little Kieran and he was loved by all. He was very kind, humble, inquisitive, loved animals, but first of all wanted to be closer to God. Various traditions connect him with different saints, which is not always chronologically correct, so the connection would have been spiritual, not physical.

Kieran may have been a disciple of St. Finian of Clonard under whom he may have studied. In his youth Kieran spent some time in continental Europe where he was ordained a priest. He probably studied in Gaul (at Tours) and Rome. On his return to Ireland, according to tradition, St. Patrick, the enlightener of the emerald isle, consecrated him the first Bishop of Ossory, where he preached the Gospels and has been venerated from time immemorial. Later the saint settled in the forests of the kingdom of Ossory where he lived in a tiny cell as a true anchorite in Saighir near the Slieve Bloom mountains. According to his biographer, St. Patrick gave him a bell saying that this bell would only ring on the spot where by the will of God Kieran would eventually found a great spiritual center—and this spot was Saighir.

By a spring, the ascetic built a cell of wattle and thin branches smeared with mud, and the roof was of grass and leaves. His diet consisted only of herbs and Continue reading “Saint Kieran of Saighir, Ireland (+530) – March 5”

Hammi: The Norwegian Forest Cat – Our pets are gifts from God – Abbot Tryphon, WA, USA

http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com

https://animalsofmyheart.wordpress.com

http://norwayofmyheart.wordpress.com

USA OF MY HEART

ANIMALS OF MY HEART

NORWAY OF MY HEART

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Hammi: The Norwegian Forest Cat

Our pets are gifts from God

Source:

https://blogs.ancientfaith.com/morningoffering/

https://blogs.ancientfaith.com/morningoffering/2017/02/hammi-norwegian-forest-cat/

ANCIENT FAITH

MORNING OFFERING

Every evening I try to spend an hour or so in the library, sitting in front of the fire place. Our beloved Norwegian Forest Cat, Hammi, sleeps in the library/community room every night. Hammi is most happy when the entire monastic brotherhood is gathered together with him. He’s an important member of our community, loved by all of us, and is the only cat I know who has his own facebook fan page, started by a woman who’d met him on a pilgrimage to the monastery (if my memory be correct).

I first met Hammi, a large male cat, as I was walking between our old trailer house (now gone) and my cell, some seventeen years ago. We startled one another, but as I reached down with extended hand, he came to me. When I picked him up he began purring immediately, so I opened a can of salmon, and he never left. A month after his arrival we Continue reading “Hammi: The Norwegian Forest Cat – Our pets are gifts from God – Abbot Tryphon, WA, USA”