Hammi: The Norwegian Forest Cat – Our pets are gifts from God – Abbot Tryphon, WA, USA

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USA OF MY HEART

ANIMALS OF MY HEART

NORWAY OF MY HEART

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Hammi: The Norwegian Forest Cat

Our pets are gifts from God

Source:

https://blogs.ancientfaith.com/morningoffering/

https://blogs.ancientfaith.com/morningoffering/2017/02/hammi-norwegian-forest-cat/

ANCIENT FAITH

MORNING OFFERING

Every evening I try to spend an hour or so in the library, sitting in front of the fire place. Our beloved Norwegian Forest Cat, Hammi, sleeps in the library/community room every night. Hammi is most happy when the entire monastic brotherhood is gathered together with him. He’s an important member of our community, loved by all of us, and is the only cat I know who has his own facebook fan page, started by a woman who’d met him on a pilgrimage to the monastery (if my memory be correct).

I first met Hammi, a large male cat, as I was walking between our old trailer house (now gone) and my cell, some seventeen years ago. We startled one another, but as I reached down with extended hand, he came to me. When I picked him up he began purring immediately, so I opened a can of salmon, and he never left. A month after his arrival we Continue reading “Hammi: The Norwegian Forest Cat – Our pets are gifts from God – Abbot Tryphon, WA, USA”

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Father Cleopa Ilie of Romania (+1998) & the birds in the Divine Liturgy

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ROMANIA OF MY HEART

Source:

http://www.sfaturiortodoxe.ro

http://ww.sfaturiortodoxe.ro

http://www.sfaturiortodoxe.roorthodox_advices_cleopa_life.htm

ORTHODOX ADVICES

Father Cleopa Ilie of Romania is a Saint of our days who died in December 2, 1998.

In May of 1948, on the feast of Ss. Constantine and Helen, Father Cleopa delivered a homily in which he said, “May God grant that our own rulers might become as the Holy King and Queen were, that the Church might be able to also commemorate them unto the ages.” The next day the state police took him to prison, leaving him in a bedless cell without bread or water for five days. After being released Father Cleopa, upon good counsel, fled to the mountains of Sihastria, where he lived in a in a hut mostly underground. There the elder prayed night and day seeking the help of God and the Theotokos.

During this time the elder was visited by the grace of God in the following way. Fr. Cleopa told his disciples that when he was building his hut, birds would come and sit on his head. The first time he served Liturgy on a stump in front of his hut, as he was communing the Holy Mysteries, a flock of birds came and gathered, such as he had never seen before. As he gazed upon them in astonishment, he noticed that each one had the sign of the Cross marked on it forehead.

Another time, after the preparation for Liturgy and having read all the prayers, he set the Antimension on the tree stump and began the Liturgy with the exclamation, “Blessed is the Kingdom of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, now and ever and unto the ages of ages!” Again the birds appeared, and as they perched in the branch of the tree they began to sing in beautiful and harmonic voices. Fr. Cleopa asked himself, “What could this be?” And an unseen voice whispered to him, “These are your chanters on the cliros.” These signs and others encouraged the Elder immensely during his time of exile.

Another time, he was serving the Divine Liturgy when he was living as a recluse and he had no choir. As he approached the time for the Cherubic Hymn, he heard a voice behind him tell him that he has his choir. Elder Cleopa looked around and birds with crosses on their heads descended and started singing the Cherubic Hymn, and then vanished when the Liturgy was over.

Saint Spyridon of Cyprus (+348) & his 100 goats

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COMING HOME – ORTHODOXY

Saint Spyridon of Cyprus (+348) & his 100 goats

Saint Spyridon once sold a hundred goats to a merchant at an agreed price, and the Saint told the buyer to lay down the money. The buyer, knowing that Saint Spyridon himself never counted money, handed over enough money for ninety-nine goats and hid the money for one. Saint Spyridon then counted out a hundred goats for him. But when the merchant and his servants drove off the goats, one of them returned bleating. He drove it off, but it returned again. And so the goat continually returned to the enclosure, not wanting to go with the other goats. The Saint then whispered into the merchant’s ear: “Observe, my son: this animal is not doing this in vain. Did you perhaps withhold her price? The merchant became ashamed and acknowledged his sin. As soon as he paid the amount he had concealed, the goat immediately joined the other goats.

Source:

Saint Nicholas Velimirovich,

The Prologue from Ohrid

Saint David Gareji of Georgia & Saint Lucian his spiritual son (+6th century) – June 9

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ANIMALS OF MY HEART

SAINTS OF MY HEART

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The Monastery of St David Gareji in Georgia

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St David Gareji of Georgia

& Saint Lucian his spiritual son

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Saint David Gareji of Georgia (+6th century)

June 9

Source:

https://oca.org

https://oca.org/saints/all-lives/2014/06/09

ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

Saint David of Gareji was Syrian by birth. The future ascetic became a disciple of Saint John of Zedazeni and journeyed with him to Georgia. Saint David and his spiritual son Lucian settled on a mountain above Tbilisi, the capital of Kartli.

At that time Kartli was constantly under threat of the Persian fire-worshippers. Saint David would spend entire days in prayer, beseeching the Lord for forgiveness of the sins of those who dwelt in the city. When he was finished praying for the day, he would stand on the mountain and bless the whole city. Once a week Saints David and Lucian would go down into the city to preach. A church dedicated to Saint David was later built on the Continue reading “Saint David Gareji of Georgia & Saint Lucian his spiritual son (+6th century) – June 9”

Saint Carannog / Carantock, Irish Missionary of Wales & Cornwall, England and his tamed dragon (dinosaur), 6th century – May 16

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IRELAND OF MY HEART

GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

ANIMALS OF MY HEART

SAINTS OF MY HEART

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Saint Carranog

and his tamed dragon (dinosaur)

6th century

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Cornwall, England

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Wales

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Saits Carranog

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Saits Carranog & Curig

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Saint Carannog / Carantock

Irish Missionary of Wales & Cornwall, England (+6th century

May 16

Saint Carantoc was the son of Ceredig, King of Cardigan, but he chose the life of a hermit and lived in a cave above the harbour of the place now called after him, Llangranog, where there is also a holy well, which he probably used. When the people tried to force him to succeed his father, he fled, and founded a religious settlement in Somerset at Continue reading “Saint Carannog / Carantock, Irish Missionary of Wales & Cornwall, England and his tamed dragon (dinosaur), 6th century – May 16”

Saint Deicola (St Deicolus), the founder and Abbot of a Monastery in Lure, France – Equal of the Apostles and Enlightener of France, from Ireland (+625) – January 18

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IRELAND OF MY HEART

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Saint Deicola / Deicolus

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Holy Relics of St Deicola

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St Deicola’s Holy Well

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Saint Deicola (St Deicolus),

the founder and Abbot of a Monastery in Lure, France

 & Equal of the Apostles and Enlightener of France, from Ireland (+625)

Patron Saint of children & animals

January 18

Saint Deicola (Déicole, Dichuil, Deel, Deicolus, Deicuil, Delle, Desle, Dichul, Dicuil) (c. 530 – January 18, 625) is an Orthodox Western saint. He was an elder brother of Saint Gall. Born in Leinster, Deicolus studied at Bangor.

He was selected to be one of the twelve followers to accompany St. Columbanus on his missionary journey. After a short stay in Great Britain in 576 he journeyed to Gaul and laboured with St. Columbanus in Austrasia and Burgundy.

When St. Columbanus was expelled by Theuderic II, in 610, St. Deicolus, then eighty years of age, determined to follow his master, but was forced, after a short time, to give up the journey, and established an hermitage at a nearby church dedicated to St Martin in a place called Lutre, or Lure, in the Diocese of Besançon, to which he had been directed by a swineherd.

Until his death, he became the apostle of this district, where he was given a church and a tract of land by Berthelde, widow of Weifar, the lord of Lure. Soon a noble abbey was erected for his many disciples, and the Rule of St. Columbanus was adopted. Numerous miracles are recorded of St. Deicolus, including the suspension of his cloak on a sunbeam and the taming of wild beasts.

Clothaire II, King of Burgundy, recognised the virtues of the saint and considerably enriched the Abbey of Lure, also granting St. Deicolus the manor, woods, fisheries, etc., of the town which had grown around the monastery. Feeling his end approaching, St. Deicolus gave over the government of his abbey to Columbanus, one of his young monks, and retreated to a little oratory where he died on 18 January, about 625.

His feast is celebrated on 18 January. So revered was his memory that his name (Dichuil), under the slightly disguised form of Deel and Deela, is still borne by most of the children of the Lure district. His Acts were written by a monk of his own monastery in the tenth century.

St. Deicolus is the Patron Saint of children and he cures childhood illnesses. Also, he is Patron Saint of animals.

Source:

Wikipedia &

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Orthodox Heart Sites

Saint Endelienta, Hermit-Martyr of Lundy Island & Cornwall, England (+6th ce.) – April 29

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GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART

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Saint Endelienta

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Saint Endelienta,

Hermit-Martyr of Lundy Island & Cornwall, England

(+6th ce.) – April 29

Saint Endelienta (also Endelient, Edellienta or Endellion) was a Cornish saint of the 5th and 6th century. She is a daughter of the Welsh King Brychan, and a native of South Wales who travelled to North Cornwall to join her siblings in converting the locals to Continue reading “Saint Endelienta, Hermit-Martyr of Lundy Island & Cornwall, England (+6th ce.) – April 29”

Saints & the animals that served them – PDF

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ANIMALS OF MY HEART

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https://www.archdiocese.ca/rescs/_files//saints-animals.pdf

Saints & the animals that served them – PDF

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Saint Artemon of Laodicea, Syria

Saint Brendan of Ireland

Saint Elijah the Prophet

Saints Florus & Laurus, Martyrs in Illyria, Croatia

Saint Gerasimus of Jordan Desert

Saint Kevin of Ireland

Saint Mamas of Caesarea, Cappadocia, Asia Minor

Saint Menas, Great Martyr of Egypt

Saint Seraphim of Sarov, Russia

Saint Sergius of Radonezh, Russia

Saint Tryphon of Campsada, Apamea, Syria

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Video: The Orthodox Patriarch of Moscow Kirill meets penguins in Antarctica – Orthodox Antarctica

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ANIMALS OF MY HEART

ORTHODOX HEART

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The Orthodox Patriarch

of Moscow Kirill meets penguins in Antarctica

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Orthodox Church in Antarctica

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Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991) & his wild birds

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ATHENS OF MY HEART

ANIMALS OF MY HEART

SAINTS OF MY HEART

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The parrot of Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991)

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Saint Porphyrios of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991)

December 2

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Saint Porphyrios

of Kafsokalivia & Athens, Greece (+1991)

& his wild birds

Saint Porphyrios was born Evangelos Bairaktaris in the village of Aghios Ioannis in the province of Karystia on the Greek island of Euboea (mod. Evia). The youngest of four, he left school after the first grade and worked in the town of Chalkida at a shop to make money for the family. He was a hard and obedient worker, and stayed there for a few years before moving to Piraeus on the mainland (it is Athens’ port) and working in a general store run by a relative.

Although he hardly knew how to read at the time, Elder Porphyrios had a copy of the Life of St John the Hut-Dweller which he read as a boy. St John inspired him. St John the Hut-Dweller was late fifth-century Constantinopolitan saint who secretly took up the monastic life at the famed monastery of the Acoimetae (Unsleeping Ones). After living for some years according to a very strict rule, St John was granted permission by his abbot to go life near his parents so as to cleanse his heart of earthly love for them. He then dwelled in a hut beside his family, identity unknown, for three years. He revealed himself to his mother on his deathbed.

Young Evangelos was inspired by St John the Hut-Dweller’s story and wanted nothing more than to become a monk. He tried to run away to Mt Athos, the Holy Mountain, to become a monk on a few occasions. When he was 12, he succeeded at his goal and entered the life of obedience to two very strict and severe elders. At the age of 14, he became a monk under the name Niketas, and at 16 he took his full vows.

During these early years of the monastic life, Elder Porphyrios was given no praise but many tasks. He spent much time alone on the mountain with no one but the birds. He learned the Psalms and the prayers by heart. And at age 19, he received a gift from the Holy Spirit of clear sight. When this gift came, he saw his elders approaching his position even though they were far away and around a corner. He knew what they were doing. Later in his life, Elder Porphyrios was able to use this gift of sight to counsel and care for the souls of the many people who came to him seeking God’s grace.

The simplicity of Elder Porphyrios’ heart is visible in his recognition of the songs of praise sung by the birds to Almighty God, a realisation he had while living on the Holy Mountain:

“One morning I was walking alone in the virgin forest. Everything, freshened by the morning dew, was shining in the sunlight. I found myself in a gorge. I walked through it and sat on a rock. Cold water was running peacefully beside me and I was saying the [Jesus] prayer. Complete peace. Nothing could be heard. After a while the silence was broken by a sweet, intoxicating voice singing and praising the Creator. I looked. I couldn’t discern anything. Eventually, on a branch opposite me I saw a tiny bird. It was a nightingale. I listened as the nightingale trilled unstintingly, its throat puffed out to bursting in sustained song. The microscopic little bird was stretching back its wings in order to find power to emit those sweetest of tones, and puffing out its throat to produce that exquisite voice. If only I had a cup of water to give it to drink and quench its thirst!

Tears came to my eyes…” (Elder Porphyrios, Wounded by Love, p. 31).

Elder Porphyrios’ love of the animal world, and of birds in particular, is illustrated by his taming of two wild parrots later in life. He wished also to tame an eagle, but I don’t know if that happened. One of his parrots would say the Jesus Prayer with him.

Ill health forced Elder Porphyrios to leave Mount Athos, and he returned to Evia where we lived at the Monastery of St Charalambos, Levka. In 1926 he was ordained priest and was given the name Porphyrios. He lived at the Monastery of St Charalambos for twelve years as a spiritual guide and confessor, and then three years at the deserted Monastery of St Nicholas in Ano Vatheia.

1940 saw the Second World War and Elder Porphyrios’ move to Athens. He became the chaplain and confessor at the Polyclinic Hospital where he served for many years, leading the liturgy and hearing confessions and ministering to the staff and patients of the hospital, many of whose previous contact with Christianity had been minimal or merely formal.

From 1955 to 1979, he lived at the Monastery of St Nicholas in Kallisia. He was still chaplain at the Polyclinic, but he was now able to also live out his lifelong dream of being a monastic at the same time. In 1979, he moved to Milesi, a village that overlooks Evia, where he lived at first in a caravan and later in a single-cell built of cinder blocks. However, the goal of founding a monastery was realised, and in 1984 he was able to move into one of the rooms of the complex under construction, and in 1990 the foundation stone of the monastic church was laid.

He returned to the Holy Mountain and died at his hermitage in Kavsokalyvia, where he had become a monk so long ago, December 2 1991.

Stories about Elder St Porphyrios abound. One time, a young man on the verge of suicide received a phone call out of the blue, and it was the saint (neither knew each other) who counselled him not to kill himself. This young man was converted, and later met Elder Porphyrios before becoming a priest himself. One young woman had a vision of Elder Porphyrios while she, too, was contemplating suicide. At both these times, Elder Porphyrios had been at prayer when the Lord made the miracle happen.

Elder Porphyrios was a man who could be deeply moved by the words of Scripture:

“One Good Friday we were doing the service. The church was packed with people. I was reading the Gospel, and when I came to the phrase, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani, that is, My God, My God, why have you forsaken me? I was unable to finish it. I didn’t read the words ‘why have you forsaken me?‘ I was overcome with emotion. My voice broke. In front of me I saw the whole tragic scene. I saw that face. I heard that voice. I saw Christ so vividly. The people in the church waited. I said nothing. I was unable to continue. I left the Gospel on the reading stand and turned back into the sanctuary. I made the sign of the cross and kissed the Holy Table. I brought to my mind another image, a better one. No, not a better one. There was no more beautiful image than that one, but the image of the Resurrection came to my mind. At once I calmed down. Then I returned to the Holy Doors and said:

‘Excuse me, my children, I got carried away’” –Wounded by Love.

Imagine if more ministers were so drawn into Scripture that their hearts were pierced in the formality of Sunday services!

I have run on long enough. There is much to say. I encourage you to learn the life and teachings of this saint — they are even available in the English book Wounded by Love: The Life and Teachings of Elder Porphyrios.